Dr.Gregg Jantz

Dr. Gregory Jantz Discusses the Potential Link Between Hypoglycemia and Depression

Dr. Gregory Jantz

For decades, Dr. Gregory Jantz has studied hundreds of patient disorders to help them arrive at a healthy resolution using his unique approach to care. Through whole-person care, which considers elements like nutrition and physical health, Dr. Jantz was able to draw a connection between depression and hypoglycemia.

Dr. Gregory Jantz pioneered his “whole-person care” approach after encountering countless patients who were unable to find relief from disorders through prescription medication alone. The one-size-fits-all approach to medicine often left his patients with a new but equally uncomfortable feeling or else failed to resolve their disorder in the slightest. Dr. Gregory Jantz’ vision for healthy living covers many lifestyle elements, and so he developed whole-person care to discover the root source of issues and help others arrive at a balance in emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being.

Dr. Jantz encourages healthy eating and often shares insight into how poor nutritional habits can contribute to existing disorders or create new ones.

“In a whole-person approach to treatment, the entire body is recognized as an important
component in depression,” says Dr. Gregg Jantz. “The whole-person approach accepts the
body as a complex organism and looks for systemic reasons for depression.”

Studying the body’s various nutritional needs, Dr. Jantz became aware of a link between low blood sugar and feelings of depression. Glucose (a form of sugar) is the body’s main source of fuel and is produced when we consume carbs, starches, and sugars. During digestion, the fuel is absorbed into the bloodstream or else stored in the liver as glycogen. Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of sugar in our blood doesn’t equal what’s needed to fuel the body’s activities.

From this condition arises mental fog, fatigue, weakness, confusion and more, which can all contribute to feelings of depression. While many people believe their lifestyle habits or past events have caused depression (and they may in fact be inciting factors), most don’t think to consider their diet. Dr. Gregory Jantz encountered too many patients that didn’t understand their nutrition, specifically their low blood sugar, was a potential cause of depression.

The abundance of food in our country often leads to self-medication, causing people to eat an excess of fatty and high-sugar foods. When this happens, the bloodstream is flooded with a surplus of fuel and usually causes a severe crash. The temporary relief or comfort that food brings quickly fades into low blood sugar crashes and symptoms of depression.

Dr. Gregory Jantz argues that depression can often be treated by helping the body correcting any nutritional deficiencies. He advocates healthier sleeping patterns, limiting calories and fatty foods, and avoiding caffeine as a source of energy.

“Relief from depression is a lot more attainable than most people know,” says Dr. Gregory Jantz. “Watching what you eat, getting a little exercise, and making sure to get out in the sun every now and then can have a tremendous impact on your well-being.”

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